Blogger Network #32 – Chambray Shirt Dress, New Look 6449

New Look 6449 Shirt Dress

Hello April! I don’t know where the time is going these days, but it seems as if I haven’t shared a project with you for a whole month and it’s time for another Minerva Blogger Network post already! In my defense, this month I’ve made a lovely chambray shirt dress (New Look 6449) to share with you, and we all know that shirt dresses don’t just sew themselves together overnight… (can you imagine?!). I used this charcoal grey chambray to make my dress, then finished it off with 12 of these silver shell-effect buttons and an Eiffel Tower motif. What do you think?

Click here to head to the Minerva Crafts website and read/see more of my shirt dress!

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Blogger Network #21 – McCalls 7120 Chambray Dress

mccalls 7120 dress

Hello, February! How glad we all are to see you. A new month means it’s time for a new Minerva Blogger Network post and today it features chambray, pockets, rolled-up sleeves and a waist tie. Above is a sneak peek of my dress (a McCalls 7120) made in wonderful striped chambray. Head over to the Minerva Crafts site by clicking the badge below to read the rest! 🙂Minerva-Crafts-Network-Logo

A Denim Elisalex

denim elisalex dressRemember in my last post when I said I had a denim Elisalex dress planned? Well, here it is! Rather than repeat myself and talk about how great the pattern is and how lovely the By Hand London girls are, I’ll just leave you with a few photographs.

The fabric, by the way, is a lightweight denim that I picked up at Boyes in Scarborough. You can find similar here at Minerva Crafts or here at My Fabrics. I also found some really lovely looking patterned denim on eBay that you might want to check out! The reason I chose to use real denim over a lighter, more versatile chambray is because it holds the shape of this dress really well – chambray fabric is quite drapey and probably wouldn’t make the tulip skirt look as effective.

denim elisalex dress

Talking about the skirt – can you see the seam I had to add in down the centre?! Unfortunately I managed to rip my fabric whilst sewing and I only had enough spare to do the front panel as two pieces, rather than one. It doesn’t look majorly out of place but it does mean that the skirt doesn’t hang as flat as I would’ve liked – I think because the fabric is still quite stiff. Perhaps once I’ve washed it a few times it’ll soften up. Other than that I think this is a success! What do you reckon?

denim elisalex

A Dotty Chambray Shirt – Burda 6849

burda 6849 polka dot shirtGuys, I made a shirt. I actually made a shirt! That fits! I demand that you all go and help yourselves to a celebratory cocktail in my honour right now (or a celebratory cup of tea if you’re at work). The idea for this project came about when Minerva Crafts started to stock this amazing, incredible, fantastic polka dot chambray fabric. I think I ordered my 1.5 metres of it about 30 seconds after it went up on the website (side note – there’s also a stripy version which I’m trying my hardest to resist!) Because chambray looks rather like denim, I thought it’d be the perfect fabric with which to make a denim-look-a-like-chambray-shirt: enter Burda 6849, courtesy of the lovely Hannah over at Simplicity. The pattern back declares that ‘these blouses ensure a young and clean look’ and that the pockets and snap fasteners have ‘all the attributes of a classy blouse’. This sounds like the pattern of my dreams right from the off – and it turns out I was right! I absolutely love this pattern – whilst it’s at least 3 steps ahead of my normal ability, I actually out-did myself with this one (if I do say so myself). I think the key here is to take your time and measure everything very carefully: it took me a few weeks to sew all the pieces together but I’m glad I didn’t rush it. Shirts require a lot of clean lines and neat edges so it’s essential that you go slowly. burda 6849 dotty blouse I chose to make view ‘B’ – which has the slightly longer length – but with the details of view ‘A’, which simply means adding snap fasteners rather than buttons. Have you ever used snap fasteners before? I got some pearl-effect ones from Minerva and had a right laugh trying to insert them – if you plan to use them in a project of your own, be aware that you’ll need a hammer, plenty of space and a patient husband. I’m not sure what our neighbour thought whilst I recklessly hammered in 12 individual snap fasteners but, you know what, I don’t care. They look great! This pattern is definitely one for the more confident sewer as it requires a multitude of different skills – top stitching, vertical darts, pockets, pocket flaps, setting in sleeves, the collar, the cuffs, sleeve plackets, snap fasteners, a curved hem… I didn’t let that put me off though, and neither should you. I think as long as you follow the instructions word-for-word then you won’t have any problems – just take your time! I can’t emphasise that enough. burda 6849 details I really hope you like my finished chambray shirt as much as I do – I’m really very proud of it (if you can’t tell!) I even did French seams on the inside to keep it all neat and tidy – particularly because chambray has a tendency to fray. Have you ever made a shirt/blouse before? How did it go? Do you plan to make one now I’ve made it look like an absolute doddle? I’d love to hear your thoughts!

By the way – this post was written to run alongside the launch of the Simplicity Blogger Circle! You can find out more about the club below (go on, you know you want to join in too…)

Simplicity Blogger Circle